Thursday, March 29, 2018

Learning Can Change the World

My friends at Learning Ninjas are in the running for the FedEx Small Business Grant.
They need your vote. Click the link below.

Vote Here

Learning can change the world.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Thoughts on Priorities

Picture of Barbara Rouse

I’m writing this in a hotel room outside Cocoa, Florida.  Mom and I drove 16+ hours (not all at once, thankfully) so we could be with family and mourn my Aunt Barbara’s passing. This was one of the sudden ones and, for me, it wasn’t until the funeral that I realized that she was gone.

She was the most elegant woman I knew and an incredibly welcoming and accepting person – curious about my adventures and encouraging me to be my best self (even if that meant dragging me to the Merle Norman to get my eyebrows waxed).

I am blessed to have the vast majority of my family members as part of my tribe and people I look forward to seeing.

It’s important to me to be able to drop everything and be able to be present (to the best of my ability) for the family.  I’m doing my best to structure my business and my life to allow that level of flex and presence.

This is what the personal “why” is about.

Dropping my work plans was a no-brainer against that metric.

Does it sometimes feel like I “should” be doing something else?  Yup.  There are so many messages telling us we must “grind” and “hustle.”  Sometimes, that all has to stop for more important things.

Like being in the car for Mom as she drives down I-95, somewhat shell-shocked that her elegant, graceful older sister is gone.

Like sitting on the seawall reeling in another catfish from the backyard while letting a cousin talk it out.

Like listening to another cousin as he tries to project manage all the things that need to happen in and amongst shock and grief and unknown resources.

Like catching up with cousins and second-cousins I almost never see – save for weddings, funerals, and important events.

Am I late with newsletters and posts? Yup.

Am I behind on my launches and sales and marketing? Yup.

Will I regret coming down to Florida, spending quality time with my Mother, and adding more memories to the extended family file?  Absolutely not.

Rest in peace, Barbara.  And thank you so much for all of your love.

May I age as gracefully as you and develop even half of your grace and elegance.

Saturday, March 24, 2018

#52books The Elite Consulting Mind

#52books The Elite Consulting Mind: 16 Proven Mindsets to Attract More Clients, Increase Your Income, and Achieve Meaningful Success (Amazon Affiliate Link)

Format: Kindle


I’m reading books on mindset these days.

I’m a firm believer in the adage that your environment and your life reflects you.

Now that I’m independent, the truth of that adage is even more evident.

It’s critical that I have my head screwed on straight.

That I’m congruent in my thoughts, words, and actions – to the best of my ability.

I’m open to any tools that will help.

Michael Zipursky has identified common mindset gaps he’s identified over the course of his consulting practice.

Everything from mistaking planning for action to undervaluing your experience to trying to do too much – he addresses the majority of the most common mistakes.  Those mistakes are a result of mindset.

I’ve personally fallen into all the traps.

The book is part of a sales funnel for his consulting business – the next step he wants you to take is joining his Accelerator Coaching Program.   I’ve used coaches myself and having that level of accountability is helpful, especially when trying to level-up or doing something new and scary.

The book, however, can stand alone as an introduction to common consulting traps.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

So How’s That Working For Ya?

The dreaded question.

Anyone who has spent time with business coaches has heard this one.

It comes out when the coach has identified one of your blind spots.

A pattern of behavior that isn’t working.

And you don’t see it. OR you are holding onto it for dear life because it is familiar.

I hated it when Matt asked me that question.  “So how’s that working for ya?”

Got me. (internal shame spiral because I think I should know better)

Now what?

I think he asked me “So how’s that working for ya?” at least once per session during our coaching engagements together.

As uncomfortable as that question is – “So how’s that working for ya?” is the question that has improved my life the most.

It forces me to think about what I am doing and why I am doing it?

It forces me to find alternatives that will better move me towards my goals.

What’s currently eating your lunch?

How are you dealing with the problem right now?

And…how’s that working for ya?


Matt Cross is an awesome business coach and has been one of my coaches for years. I’m not affiliated, just sharing information 🙂  Schedule a call with him at https://www.mattcrosscoaching.com/ 


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

#52books Coaching for Performance

#52Books – Coaching for Performance Fifth Edition: The Principles and Practice of Coaching and Leadership UPDATED 25TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION (Amazon Affiliate Link)

Format: Softcover

—————————

My primary skill-building goal for the year – get better at coaching.

Any problems I’ve had on projects have, at their core, been people issues.

It is to be expected.

We can’t control people.

What we CAN do is to try to develop ourselves so that people are more likely to behave in the manner we desire. Or, at least, feel ok about our part of the interaction.  I don’t know about you, but whenever I “lose it,” I usually feel terrible for a long time afterward.

Sir John Whitmore and Coaching for Performance is the classic coaching textbook for people who want the skills, but aren’t necessarily out to become a “life coach.”

The emphasis is on professional performance. In his final edition, he provides question streams, the GROW (Goals, Reality, Options, What you will do), and ways to measure the effectiveness of this approach.

The Agile (and any Agile-hybrid) approach requires Project Managers to be more like coaches and mentors. This would be the first reference I would give someone if they find themselves wanting to move to a coaching-style of management.

There’s a reason why this book, in its five editions, is a classic.  I’ve already got this book beat-up and dog-eared. High praise for a reference.


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Asking Questions

Doug Rose, in his Lynda.com course Learning Data Science: Ask Great Questions, observed that in most organizations, questions are seen as (and often are) confrontational.

Questions are saved for bad news and to show displeasure.

Questions are used as political weapons.

Questions are interpreted as a sign of ignorance.

Is it any wonder we are afraid of asking interesting questions? Or even asking ANY questions?

I’ve been fortunate to spend most of my career as the History/Education major in a room full of engineers.

The “trainer.”

I treated that role as an opportunity to ask all of the “dumb” questions that everyone else was too afraid to ask.

Starting with school, and through our working life, we have been trained to be afraid of asking questions.

Time to change that.

It starts with us.

  1. Start asking questions, no matter how stupid they seem to you.  Chances are, someone else in the room has the same question.
  2. If you get the eye-rolling, impatient or whatever response from the responder, repeat the following to yourself: “It’s not personal. Their response is theirs.”
  3. Observe when you are impatient with others’ questions.  We have so much information thrown at us on a daily basis, is it any wonder we have to ask the same thing repeatedly to make it stick?
  4. Try not to ask the same thing twice with the same person 🙂  Be fully present for the response you receive.

Questioning / Answering is a form of Giving / Receiving.

Done well, we can build relationships and make each others’ lives a little bit easier.

What question have you asked today?


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

How to Avoid Dysfunctional Organizations

In The Seven Signs of Ethical Collapse: How to Spot Moral Meltdowns in Companies… Before It’s Too Late (Amazon affiliate link), Marianne Jennings defined the warning signs of a dysfunctional organization:

  1. Pressure to “meet the numbers.”  And those numbers are often wildly unreasonable.
  2. Fear, silence, and sycophancy.  If you are new to an organization – check your vibes and the body language of the line staff.
  3. A larger-than-life CEO and suspiciously young or inexperienced direct reports.  I tend to be suspicious of “cult-leaders” anyway. Too many years as a grad student will do that.  As a result, I haven’t personally seen this dynamic in action in an organization.  Frankly, in this day and age, “larger-than-life” CEO should at least be a trigger for some significant investigation into a company before joining them.
  4. A weak board. I would also add a board focused on “meeting the numbers.”  The organizations I’ve worked for have typically been purpose-driven. When the board moves away from a focus on the purpose (say…improving the student experience) and begins to focus on numbers (e.g. cutting costs) – I’ve found that signs of dysfunction show up in that organization quickly.
  5. A culture of conflicts (of interest).  Too many relatives in one place sitting in key positions raises red flags in my head.  I’ve seen that work well…once. Nepotism policies exist for a reason. If you are coming in as an outsider and you are not in complete agreement with one of the “core team” – good luck.
  6. “Innovation like no other.”  Jennings defines this as company leadership who see themselves as the “visionaries who can reinvent business.” I’ve learned that any organization that thinks they are that special and different have a lot of waste and organizational bleed. And good luck trying to make any business process improvements, or getting through a technology implementation or upgrade without blowing your budget and customizing your solution past the point of usefulness. I treat companies that claim to be innovative with the same suspicion I treat people who claim to be professional if they haven’t provided evidence.
  7. “Goodness in some areas atones for evil in others.”  Jennings notes this as companies using faux philanthropy and social goodness – hoping it will offset cooked books, fraud, etc.  I think it’s deeper than that. For me, this sign is about looking at what the day-to-day is like vs. the special events.  How does the organization treat their employees on a daily basis vs. during the designated celebration times and special events (like the annual employee of the year ceremony).  What does recognition look like? Who gets recognized and rewarded with promotions, raises, interesting projects etc. vs a shiny plaque? What behaviors are reinforced daily?

Looking back at my career, it struck me as I read this that seeing changes in one of these areas is a key sign that the organization is changing.  Either for the good, such as working to standardize processes and focusing on improving the day-to-day, or the bad, such as a new leader who only listens to sycophants.

The great thing about today’s workplace is that we are the means of production. Our knowledge. Our energy.

We are the scarce resource.

It’s OK to move to an environment that better suits your needs.


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.


 

 

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Being Courageous In The Workplace

Courage is rightly esteemed the first of human qualities because it is the quality which guarantees all others - Winston Churchill

Lance Secretan states that courage is the foundational ingredient required for leaders.

It takes courage to speak your truth in environments that may not be ready to hear what you say.

It takes courage to admit you don’t know the answers, to apologize, to make mistakes, to be authentic, to take the first steps towards the unknown.

It takes courage to risk rejection, to face criticism, to rise above intimidation.


A recent conversation had me thinking about courage in the workplace.

What is it about the environments that we are in that makes it so scary to be our authentic selves?

Why does it take so much courage, in so many workplaces, to be truthful?

During that conversation, I realized that I have been in something of a privileged position in the workplaces that I have functioned in.

  1. Being the “trainer” in IT departments usually means being the least technical (and therefore dumbest) person in the room. Since expectations of my understanding are low, it’s easier for me to ask what appear to be obvious questions.
  2. The environments I’ve worked have rewarded that behavior from me – if not with the usual social awards such as promotions. The reward has been in the conversations after the fact and the relationships built as a result. The one-on-one thank yous for opening up the conversation. The built reputation for being a “truth-teller.” The meetings with new executives whose first sentence is often “they told me to come talk to you.”  And, occasionally, the changes that are made to projects or policy or activities as a result.  I didn’t see this when I was in the environment. Only now, with some distance, am I seeing the rewards for what they truly are.
  3. I was lucky to be in an environment in my most recent job where I wasn’t the only truth-teller.  I have been blessed with colleagues who were masters at taking the air out of the room by exposing the elephant in it.  We had each other’s backs.  That was a blessing.  Not many people have that in their workplace.
  4. My last boss encouraged my truth-telling and helped me find the language so that the message was more palatable.
  5. In my current work, people are paying me to be courageous and tell the truth to them. It’s my job to tell people when things are going off the rails. It’s my job to help them avoid disaster, or show them how the decisions they are making may not lead to the outcomes they expect.
  6. Since I’m also working as an outsider, it’s easier for me to be truthful.  I don’t have promotions or bonuses on the line.
  7. I’ve concluded that it is more important to me to work with people and organizations who are willing to engage openly and authentically than it is to keep a client no matter what.  I am the scarce resource.

I’ve come to recognize that it is easier in some environments to be courageous than in others.

It’s easier to be courageous when you aren’t gunning for promotion and you have people in the environment who have your back.

It’s easier to be courageous when you have immediate managerial support and you are working from a place of inspiration.

The next question – how can we create those environments for others?


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Saturday, March 10, 2018

#52books The Spark, The Flame, and The Torch

#52 Books – The Spark, the Flame, and the Torch:Inspire Self. Inspire Others. Inspire the World. (Amazon affiliate link)

Format: Kindle

“Life is a mirror and will reflect back to the thinker what he thinks into it” Ernest Holmes

Lance Secretan argues that we are now seeing in our economy and our workspaces exactly what we have been thinking. And it’s not working.

“Our social and corporate cultures have developed into ones that brilliantly reward the metrics of performance while overlooking the measures of the heart, and this has caused an evaporation of inspiration.”

So what?

People want to be inspired.

Inspiration, Secretan argues, is a result of a leader who is clear about WHY they are here (Destiny), how they will BE while they are here (Character) and what they have been called to DO (Calling).

“There are two givens that we all share:

  • Our passion is drawn to the things that excite us – positively and negatively
  • At our core, we all yearn to serve and improve the world”

Inspiring others means serving others.

Motivating others, as Secretan defines it, means serving self.

Practically everything we talk about in business and education is about “motivating”.

How do I get others to do X?

Secretan wants us to look within first and get clear on your destiny, character, and calling.  Then demonstrate that through your moment-to-moment interactions and consistent action.

He then moves out into the corporate environment and provides a few techniques for developing an inspirational vision for your organization.

For an inspirational vision to work, leaders need to prioritize employees, then customers, then shareholders (think Disney, Southwest Airlines, Nordstroms).  Too many organizations, Secretan noted, focus on shareholders first, then customers, and then (maybe) employees.

Secretan wrote that well before the recent tax law changes. In multiple surveys and summits, the majority of CEOs planned to spend the money for stock buybacks and dividends or mergers and acquisitions. Investing in the company (capital spend) or its workers was not as high a priority.

We’re hitting a point in our economy where having your own company and being a shareholder (no matter how small) is more secure, less soul-sucking, and has a higher probability of financial remuneration than being an employee somewhere.  This includes the risks involved in starting your own business.

The knowledge workers who these organizations need to grow and thrive in today’s environment are coming to that conclusion themselves.  Many of them are pro-actively deciding to go independent.  By 2020, more than 40% of US workers will be independent and that number will grow rapidly.

If you are in a leadership position, Secretan has provided a toolkit to help you staunch the bleeding of your best talent and become the leader that talent needs you to be.

It starts with you.

Thursday, March 08, 2018

Values at Work

I’ve been reading a lot of leadership literature recently. A theme keeps appearing.

Values.

Personal values.

Define the values you want to live by. Use them as the foundation for your career and leadership style.

Typically, they will define the values you should follow for you.

And some will focus on how to get others to share those values.

Interestingly, I haven’t been in too many workplaces where values are deeply discussed – beyond “You really ought to have these values.”

  1. I don’t know how many people have deeply thought about the values they hold.  There’s not much in our society that encourages this.
  2. If they have thought about values, it’s more because someone has told them they should hold these values vs. questioning why they hold these values and whether the values they are holding (that they may have gotten from elsewhere) still work for them. Again, there is not much encouragement in our society for this level of reflection.
  3. If they are confident in the values they hold, their workplace is not a safe place to discuss these values.  Especially if the values they hold contradict either the stated values or the behavioral values.

I’m thinking that helping to cultivate a safe environment for deeply reflecting on, then sharing, personal values is key.

If I’m going to try and create this space for someone else, this looks like questioning, staying curious, and being open to the answer.

Most importantly, not trying to shift someone else’s values to look like mine.

I’m thinking more 1-1 time, being clear and open about the values I hold, and doing my best to deeply listen is part of it too.

What are the values you hold?

Why do you hold them?

What does a safe space for discussing values look like to you?


Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Tuesday, March 06, 2018

Missing Deadlines

I am coming clean.

I missed my deadline for releasing my new service – Meaningful Flow.

I meant to release it in January and the newsletter the first week in February.

Both are out now, and I’ll provide all of the information at the bottom of this post. It’s all out later than I intended.

I have a visceral reaction when I miss deadlines or I’m late. Hate. It.  It’s even worse when others are waiting.

Right now, I want to provide a public apology for not doing what I said I was going to do when I said I was going to do it and share some lessons learned from this experience.


Lesson #1 – Minimum Viable Product, define what that looks like early.

I fell into the trap of trying to make this big, huge, monster of a thing and get all the pieces perfect. All at once.

You know – the thing I tell others NOT to do. Don’t try to do all the things all at once.  Yeah. That.

It happens.

So many great ideas.  The muse is beckoning.  Then the inner perfectionist gremlin begins to chime in. And it becomes one very loud, unfocused, unproductive party in my head. Paralysis sets in.

Best thing I did in this process – stopped as I started getting overwhelmed by all the things and defined a minimum viable product.

The benefit to this – I now have space to let clients and customers shape this so that it is more useful to THEM.

That’s a win for everyone.


Lesson #2 – Create a clear vision … and keep your eye on it

It is so easy to get into the weeds and lose sight of the vision.

I got distracted from my vision with a bunch of other stuff.  The things I thought I “should” do.

This is where having objective outsiders with a fresh eye to talk to are invaluable.

I had a key one-hour conversation with Julia, a marketing consultant out of the UK.

We had never talked before.  She reminded me of my vision, then helped me take all of the random pieces I had been working on and restructure them into something that better reflected that vision.

Was there rework?  Absolutely!

Am I happier and more confident in how I am developing Meaningful Flow?  Absolutely!


Lesson #3 – Sometimes clarity takes a few drafts

I don’t know about you, but I learn a lot as I create things.

Here’s the difference between agile and running in circles – I still have a decent idea of my objective and WHY I am doing it.

I still want to help make the workplace more humane.

I still believe that to get there will be about supporting individuals.

The specifics surfaced as I worked, received feedback, and talked to people.

And it will continue to do so.


Lesson #4 – Delays can be positive

In late January, after 3 iterations of my marketing architecture, including 2 attempts at webinar software, 2 attempts at email campaign software, and a complete re-design of my marketing funnel – a new product came out in beta that has been solving most of my earlier issues.

I had a choice – launch with what I have or transition everything to the new system.

I decided to transition everything to the new system.

3 weeks later and I feel it was time well spent. I know I am happier.  Hopefully, you will like it too. Feedback welcome.


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Monday, March 05, 2018

#52books Born to Win

#52 Books – Born to Win: Find Your Success

Format: Softcover

Zig Ziglar is your classic, old-school sales trainer.  Get beneath the 70s era salesguy persona and the Southern Baptist preacher delivery and you find that there is a reason why his work remains a classic.

When I was growing up, Mom was a real estate agent, a broker, and telecommunications sales manager (beepers, anyone?). Zig Ziglar, Earl Nightingale, Brian Tracy, and Dale Carnegie were all in heavy rotation in Mom’s cassette deck in the 80s and early 90s.  My younger brother took these involuntary lessons from our rides in the car and ran with them in his adulthood.

My natural state is reclusive academic, so it is only now that I am realizing how useful these teachings are.

Born to Win is Ziglar’s final book. This book distills the teachings from his entire career, with his son’s addition of a business model for entrepreneurs and business leaders.

I started to put together my Meaningful Flow service before I read this book. Seeing Ziglar’s model – plan to win by clarifying your objectives, prepare to win by increasing your skills and developing your map, and expect to win by doing the work and keeping your attitude positive – was incredibly validating.

The fundamentals of Ziglar’s work boils down to

“You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what THEY want.”

Everything Ziglar presents is to support you in helping others.

To successfully help others, Ziglar argues, you need to build a personally strong foundation of values and purpose. The values he recommends: honesty, character, faith, integrity, love, and loyalty.  If you read across the spectrum of leadership literature – you will see variations on this theme.  Fundamentally, it helps to be strong and clear internally before one can truly make an impact on his or her environment.

Knowing my values and why I am doing something helps me make decisions. It helps me evaluate and reflect on my interactions.  Being able to ask – “Can I help them get what THEY want?  Did I succeed in doing so?” – provides a good metric for my performance with clients.

Underneath that question, “Can I help them get what THEY want?” is an evaluation of whether the client and I are a match.

– Do I understand what they want?

– Do we share values and purpose within that understanding?

– Do I have the skills to help them?

If all 3 are a resounding “yes” – then we are in for a great relationship.

If one is a “no” – the best thing I can do is try to point them in the right direction and see if I can find someone in my network who is a better fit.

Growing up, I saw Ziglar as the consummate salesman, teacher of closing techniques, and the type of guy to avoid like the plague. Ask my former co-workers about my reputation for terrorizing vendor reps.

After reading Born to Win, I’ve finally realized that there was more depth to Ziglar’s message than I ever gave him credit for.


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

Thursday, March 01, 2018

Worry and Disasterizing

Just stop worrying. Really.

from Sarah’s Scribbles


I don’t know about you, but there seems to be an awful lot of “danger” in the environment today.

Purposeful instability and insecurity have been designed into many of our organizations – often in the name of “agility.”

Noise and exposure have been designed into many of our working environments – often in the name of “collaboration.”

The fear-mongering in our society seems shriller and inescapable.

The demands for our attention are higher, greater and louder.

Is it any wonder that more than 300 million people suffer from depression and more than 260 million people suffer from anxiety globally? (2017 World Health Organization study)

1 in 5 American adults experiences mental illness in a given year. 

A …given…YEAR.

My suspicion is that the number is higher – given that less than 20% of Americans with moderate depressive symptoms seek help or say anything and less than 41% of adults with ANY mental health issue sought help. (Fortune, October 2017)


I’m beginning to think that anxiety, depression, and PTSD – rather than being mental illnesses – are really humane reactions to the environment we have created for ourselves.

I’m beginning to think that anxiety, depression, and PTSD are appropriate reactions to the major and minor traumas we experience, often on a daily basis.

I’m glad that there are now conversations about de-stigmatizing mental illness.

Maybe we should start having conversations about creating environments and workplaces that don’t trigger anxiety, depression, and PTSD in the first place?

Maybe we should start having conversations about developing relationships built on support, respect and, dare I say it, love, regardless of the context?


Overwhelmed by busywork?

Want more time to focus on the things that are most important to you?

Join the Flowbox – a subscription service containing short videos, tools, and templates to help you overcome overwhelm, reduce meaningless busywork, and find flow in your work and your life.

Use the coupon betatestmonthly for 20% off the first 6 months of your subscription.

10% of all subscription fees received through December 31, 2018, will go to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.