Saturday, May 12, 2007

More thoughts on PowerPoint

In the comments, Emma asked "What do you want to SEE in the PowerPoint."

Anything other than PowerPoint.

You know...fun exercises, discussion, games, other modes of imparting information in a way that might stick.

I even find myself missing the "good old days" of grainy, illegible blackboard drawings, overhead projectors and slide shows.

I take my own notes anyway (I learn more this way and it keeps me from falling asleep), so I don't particularly care if I'm given the PowerPoint as a handout.

Lectures and presentations aren't going away anytime soon. And PowerPoint remains the tool of choice to support these presentations. Heck, a part of my job is designing presentations and PowerPoint for the boss. If only because conferences (and the boss) expect these types of presentations.

When I design PowerPoint for the boss, I create 2 PowerPoint files.

- File 1 - the one he reads off of and handouts
- File 2 - the one with supporting graphics, main takeaways and embedded multimedia

Again, if I can get people to stop reading their *%#!*# slides, I will be a happy camper.

1 comment:

Emma said...

You know...fun exercises, discussion, games, other modes of imparting information in a way that might stick. ...

Which can be great, if you've got a good idea to explain a point, and if you're able to get the class to see why they're doing it. Sometimes activities planned go down like a house on fire ... other times it's a ton of bricks & it's hard to know why...

When I design PowerPoint for the boss, I create 2 PowerPoint files.

- File 1 - the one he reads off of and handouts
- File 2 - the one with supporting graphics, main takeaways and embedded multimedia

What happens to file 2, is it the one that he shows?

I'd love to have the time to do that! I guess the point that I@m trying to make, is the diffculty of meeting differing expectations - e.g. students expect handouts; the department expect notes to be made available for students who are away, (and also in advance for dyslexic students, in case they have to learn new words etc).

On the other hand, I like to have a fairly flexible classroom - I try to get them going, though that's often easier said than done - especially at first, when they think I'm more than a bit weird.

My dream would be to be good enough to teach without the need for Presentation Software. But I'm not a good enough teacher.